Services


DOPA provides a number of web services which can be used for your own applications, see 
 
When using our services or data sets, please use the following citation:
Joint Research Centre of the European Commission (2018). The Digital Observatory for Protected Areas (DOPA), http://dopa.jrc.ec.europa.eu/ (accessed month/year).
 
For more technical information about the data preparation and processing, please see our Technical Documentation. 

 

 

 

Data Sources


You will find hereafter the links to the core datasets used in DOPA. More information about the use of these data to generate our indicators can be found in our Factsheets and our  Wiki provides additional details regarding the processing of these data. 

Country boundaries
Country boundaries used in DOPA are built from a combination of GAUL country boundaries and exclusive economic zones (EEZ). The full details regarding the preparation of the base layers is documented in Bastin et al. (2017)
 
Reference: 
Bastin, L., Mandrici, A., Battistella, L., Dubois, G. (2017). Processing Conservation Indicators with Open Source Tools: Lessons Learned from the Digital Observatory for Protected Areas. In: Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial (FOSS4G) Conference Proceedings: Vol. 17, Article 14. August 14-19, 2017, Boston, MA, USA. http://scholarworks.umass.edu/foss4g/vol17/iss1/14/
 
Protected areas
DOPA uses only the World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) available on Protected Planet.  Protected Planet®, underpinned by the WDPA, is a joint product of UN Environment and IUCN, managed by UNEP-WCMC and IUCN working with governments, communities and collaborating partners
 
Unless explicitly stated, the version used in DOPA is the one of October 2017.
 
Reference: 
UNEP-WCMC and IUCN (2017). Protected Planet: The World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) [On-line], [October/2017], Cambridge, UK: UNEP-WCMC and IUCN. www.protectedplanet.net

 

Species data

A uses the species range maps and summary statistics from the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species TM which is the world’s most comprehensive information source on the global conservation status of animal, fungi and plant species. It contains a rich compendium of supporting information of the distribution range, ecological requirements, habitats and threats to species and on conservation actions that can be taken to reduce or avoid extinctions.

 

Reference: 

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species TM 2017 version 2 (IUCN, 2017) 
 
Terrestrial Ecoregions

Terrestrial ecoregions of the world (TEOW). 

 
Reference: 

Olson, D. M., et al. (2001). Terrestrial ecoregions of the world: A new map of life on Earth. Bioscience, 51: 933–938. https://doi.org/10.1641/0006-3568(2001)051[0933:TEOTWA]2.0.CO;2   

 

Marine Ecoregions

Marine ecoregions of the world (MEOW). 

 

Reference: 
Spalding, M.D., et al. (2007). Marine Ecoregions of the World: A bioregionalization of coastal and shelf seas. Bioscience, 57, 573–583. https://doi.org/10.1641/B570707
 
Built-up areas
Built-up areas are derived from the Global Human Settlement (GHS) built-up grid for the years 1975, 1990, 2000, 2014 (Pesaresi et al., 2015)
 
Reference: 
Pesaresi, M., et al. (2015). GHS built-up grid, derived from Landsat, multitemporal (1975, 1990, 2000, 2014). European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC) [Dataset] PID: http://data.europa.eu/89h/jrc-ghsl-ghs_built_ldsmt_globe_r2015b
 
Topography and Bathymetry
Topography and bathymetry are available in a single global 30 arc-second grid, the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO) 2014 Grid.
 
Reference: 
Weatherall, P., et al. (2014). A new digital bathymetric model of the world's oceans. Earth and Space Science, 2, https://doi.org/10.1002/2015EA000107  
 
Climate
Terrestrial climate data, i.e. monthly average rainfall values and minimum, maximum and mean temperature values computed over the period 1970-2000 were extracted from a single global 30 arc-second grid, the WorldClim 2, Release 1, June 2016 (Fick & Hijmans, 2017) 
 
Reference: 
Fick, S.E. & R.J. Hijmans (2017). WorldClim 2: New 1-km spatial resolution climate surfaces for global land areas. International Journal of Climatology, 37: 4302-4315. https://doi.org/10.1002/joc.5086  
 
Population
Population density and changes in population density were derived from the Global Human Settlement Layer (GHSL) global layer for the years 1975, 1990, 2000, 2015 (EC-JRC & CIESIN, 2015). See also Freire et al. (2016)
 
Reference: 
European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC); Columbia University, Center for International Earth Science Information Network - CIESIN (2015). GHS population grid, derived from GPW4, multitemporal (1975, 1990, 2000, 2015). European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC) [Dataset] PID: http://data.europa.eu/89h/jrc-ghsl-ghs_pop_gpw4_globe_r2015a
 
Freire, S., et al. (2016). Development of new open and free multi-temporal global population grids at 250m resolution. In: Proc. of the 19th AGILE Conference on Geographic Information Science. June 14-17, Helsinki, Finland, 2016. https://agile-online.org/conference_paper/cds/agile_2016/shortpapers/152_Paper_in_PDF.pdf
 
Roads
DOPA uses the global roads dataset gROADS version 1. 1980-2010. (CIESIN-ITOS, 2013)
 
Reference: 
CIESIN-ITOS (2013). Center for International Earth Science Information Network - CIESIN - Columbia University, and Information Technology Outreach Services - ITOS - University of Georgia. 2013. Global Roads Open Access Data Set, Version 1 (gROADSv1). Palisades, NY: NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC). http://dx.doi.org/10.7927/H4VD6WCT  
 
Agricultural Pressure
DOPA uses the IIASA-IFPRI cropland percentage map for the baseline year 2005 (Fritz et al., 2015). The global IIASA-IFPRI cropland percentage map integrates a number of individual cropland maps at global to regional to national scales (hybrid or data fusion approach for map production), and has an overall accuracy of 82.4% .
 
Reference: 
Fritz, S., et al. (2015). Mapping global cropland and field size. Global Change Biology, 21: 1980–1992. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/gcb.12838
 
Land cover
Single annual land cover maps for the years 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2015 of 300 m resolution were obtained from the Land Cover Climate Change Initiative (Land Cover CCI 2017).
 
Reference: 

Land Cover CCI (2017). Product User Guide Version 2.0 http://maps.elie.ucl.ac.be/CCI/viewer/download/ESACCI-LC-Ph2-PUGv2_2.0.pdf

 

Forest cover

Forest gain and loss are computed over 2011-2016 using the data from the Global Forest Watch (Hansen et al., 2013)

 

Reference: 
Hansen, M. C., et al. (2013). High-Resolution Global Maps of 21st-Century Forest Cover Change. Science 342 (15 November): 850–53.  https://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1244693
 
Inland Surface Water

Global surface water data and long-term changes are coming from a 30 m resolution global map showing 32-year history of Landsat data between 1984 and 2015 (Pekel, J.F. et al., 2016).

 

Reference: 
Pekel, J.-F., Cottam, A., Gorelick, N. & Belward, A. S. (2016). High-resolution mapping of global surface water and its long-term changes. Nature, 540: 418-422. https://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature20584
 
EEZ boundaries

Country boundaries used in DOPA are built from a combination of GAUL (2015) country boundaries and exclusive economic zones (EEZ Version 9). The full details regarding the preparation of the base layers is documented in Bastin et al. (2017)

 

Reference:

Bastin, L., Mandrici, A., Battistella, L., Dubois, G. (2017). Processing Conservation Indicators with Open Source Tools: Lessons Learned from the Digital Observatory for Protected Areas. In: Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial (FOSS4G) Conference Proceedings: Vol. 17, Article 14. August 14-19, 2017, Boston, MA, USA. http://scholarworks.umass.edu/foss4g/vol17/iss1/14/