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EU Biodiversity Strategy Actions Tracker

In the EU Biodiversity Strategy for 2030, the EU and its Member States committed to implement more than 100 actions by 2030. Please see below an overview of progress.

This tool is designed to track progress in the implementation of the actions listed in the EU Biodiversity Strategy for 2030.



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EU NATURE RESTORATION PLAN

Restoring marine ecosystems

Target 15 - The negative impacts on sensitive species and habitats, including on the seabed through fishing and extraction activities, are substantially reduced to achieve good environmental status.

Updated on: 2022-05-05


Deadline: 2030

Summary: This action is linked to the action on fisheries management measures, and to the action plan to conserve fisheries resources and protect marine ecosystems. The objectives are partially achieved, for fish stocks with MSY advice in the northeast Atlantic (including the North Sea, Channel, Irish and Baltic Seas), although some stocks are above and some are below this rate. In the Mediterranean Sea the current rate is still close to twice the target rate. For the Mediterranean and the Black Sea, the Fisheries Council decided on a 7.5% reduction of fishing effort for 2021, complemented by an international commitment to implement a 10% reduction. The Council also agreed to a 12% reduction of fishing effort for demersal stocks in the Adriatic in 2021.


Main Actors:
COM
MS

Chef de File:
MARE

Updated on: 2022-04-13


Deadline: 2022

Summary: The initiative will link the implementation of the common fisheries policy with environmental legislation and policy, notably the Birds, Habitats and the Marine Strategy Framework Directives and set out actions to protect and restore fisheries resources and marine ecosystems. It will complement the report on the implementation of the 2019 Technical Measures Regulation (TMR), which showed that some Member States have used the regionalised approach to introduce additional fisheries measures to protect sensitive species and habitats at the national and regional level. The action plan will be an important step alongside other measures such as the extension and effective management of marine protected areas and the adoption of legally binding restoration targets.


Main Actors:
COM

Chef de File:
ENV
MARE

Updated on: 2022-05-16


Deadline: 2022

Summary: Maritime Spatial Plans under the MSP Directive need to take into account land-sea interactions and apply an ecosystem-based management approach to reduce the adverse impacts of fishing, extraction and other human activities on species and habitats. This is of high importance for sea basins with legal instruments in place, like the Mediterranean (ICZM Protocol). Maritime spatial plans need to be consistent with the marine strategies that Member States have prepared under the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive to ensure that the legal obligations are achieved. The Commission will publish a report in 2022.

Links:


Main Actors:
COM
MS

Chef de File:
MARE

Updated on: 2021-12-01


Deadline: 2030

Summary: Marine protected areas need to be designated and effectively managed to protect habitats and species protected by the Birds and Habitats Directives as well as to achieve good environmental status of marine ecosystems under the MSFD. Management of a given MPA may require regulating fishing activities. Since the conservation of marine biological resources under the common fisheries policy (CFP) is an exclusive competence of the European Union, it is up to the EU to take any fisheries-related measures. The CFP provides for a toolbox for taking fisheries conservation measures and gives also Member States the chance to play an active role in designing fisheries measures through the so-called regionalisation.


Main Actors:
COM
MS

Chef de File:
MARE

Updated on: None


Deadline: 2022

Summary: This action is about providing financial support for the transition to more selective gear and less damaging fishing techniques through the actions supported by the European Maritime, Fisheries and Aquaculture Fund (EMFAF) Programmes. The Commission will ensure that the EMFAF contributes to the achievement of the overall environment, climate and biodiversity targets established in the Multiannual Financial Framework 2021-2027 through a series of actions, including the promotion of sustainable, low-impact and low-carbon fishing activities.


Main Actors:
COM
MS

Chef de File:
MARE

Target 16 - The by-catch of species is eliminated or reduced to a level that allows species recovery and conservation.

Updated on: 2021-12-09


Deadline: 2030

Summary: The by-catch of species threatened with extinction must be eliminated or reduced to a level that allows their full recovery. This should also be the case for species in bad conservation status or not in good environmental status under the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Furthermore, by-catch of other species must be eliminated or, where this is not possible, minimised so as not to threaten their conservation status. To support this, data collection on by-catch for all sensitive species needs to be stepped up.


Main Actors:
COM
MS

Chef de File:
ENV
MARE


ENABLING TRANSFORMATIVE CHANGE

Financing for biodiversity

Updated on: 2021-12-10


Deadline: 2022

Summary: The implementation of this action will operationalise the 'do no harm' principle under the Multiannual Financial Framework and NextGeneration EU. Biodiversity was addressed in the Commission checklist developed in the context of the evaluation of the national Recovery and Resilience Plans, as well as in the sustainability proofing guidelines developed in the context of InvestEU. Biodiversity will be integrated in upcoming work on operationalizing the ‘do no harm’ principle across other EU funds and programmes.


Main Actors:
COM
MS

Chef de File:
AGRI
BUDG
ECFIN
ENV
INTPA
MARE
REGIO


EU EXTERNAL ACTION AND AN AMBITIOUS GLOBAL BIODIVERSITY AGENDA

International Ocean Governance

Updated on: 2022-04-05


Deadline: 2022

Summary: Covering nearly two-thirds of the world’s oceans and about 95% of their volume, areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ) comprise the high seas (water column) and the subjacent international seabed (the Area). These areas contain a rich biodiversity of both ecological and socioeconomic importance. However, this biodiversity is under mounting pressure, including from overexploitation, pollution, the impacts of climate change, and the spread of invasive species. The increasing demand for marine resources in the coming decades – for food, minerals or biotechnology – risks further exacerbating this problem. Faced with these challenges and following over a decade of preparatory work, an overwhelming majority of States in the United Nations agreed in 2017 on the need for a new legally binding instrument under the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). The envisioned international agreement would further implement existing principles in UNCLOS in order to achieve a more holistic management of high seas activities, which should better balance the conservation and sustainable use of marine resources. These principles include the obligation of cooperation, the science-based approach to the conservation and management of marine resources, the duty to protect and preserve the marine environment, and the duty to undertake prior impact assessment of activities. This agreement should cover four areas: 1) marine genetic resources and the sharing of benefit; 2) area based management tools, including marine protected areas; 3) environmental impact assessments; and 4) capacity building and the transfer of marine technology. It would also further support the achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, in particular Sustainable Development Goal 14 (“Life Below Water”). The ongoing negotiations also offer perspectives with regard to establishing procedures for identifying and managing marine protected areas in the high seas. The EU and its Member States have been engaged in this process since its beginning . They have launched a High Ambition Coalition in February 2022, at the One Ocean Summit, to enhance momentum and mobilize countries in support of achieving an ambitious and inclusive agreement the soonest. The Intergovernmental Conference hold its fourth session in March 2022, after two years of COVID interruption. Progress has been achieved that suggests that an agreement is still possible in 2022. Consequently, efforts are made to convene a fifth session of the Intergovernmental Conference in August 2022 with a view to achieve the negotiations.


Main Actors:
COM
MS

Chef de File:
MARE

Updated on: 2022-04-06


Deadline: 2022

Summary: The EU and its Member States have submitted two MPA proposals to the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR), one in East Antarctica (since 2012) and another in the Weddell Sea (since 2016). Although both proposals are based on best available science, they have never managed to reach consensus due to continued opposition from two CCAMLR Members. The two MPA proposals are also co-sponsored by the United States, New Zealand, South Korea, India, Ukraine, Australia, Uruguay, Norway and the United Kingdom. A third proposal, from Chile and Argentina, proposes to create a MPA in the Antarctic Peninsula.


Main Actors:
COM
MS

Chef de File:
MARE

Updated on: 2022-04-26


Deadline: 2022

Summary: In international negotiations, the EU should advocate that marine minerals in the international seabed area cannot be exploited before the effects of deep-sea mining on the marine environment, biodiversity and human activities have been sufficiently researched, the risks are understood and the technologies and operational practices are able to demonstrate no serious harm to the environment, in line with the precautionary principle and taking into account the call of the European Parliament. However, the role of the European Commission at the Council meetings of the International Seabed Authority (ISA) so far has been limited to its capacity of observer. A mapping of EU competences in the draft mining code shows that the EU can claim competence on the parts of the regulations dealing with the protection of the marine environment.

Links:


Main Actors:
COM

Chef de File:
MARE